Clean Reserve’s Citron Fig: an Ethically Made Perfume (Review)

If you saw my post from Tuesday, you know I’m pretty much diving into the world of sustainable, ethical goods blindly. No actually, you could probably put a blindfold over my clueless head and I’d be in the same exact spot. But one thing I do know is that I need to start researching more and more about what and how I’m consuming products.

During the Christmas season, my boyfriend gave me Clean Reserve’s Citron Fig perfume and not only did I fall for the delicious smell but I fell for the company itself. (Props to Rob for really knowing how to give good gifts). The more I researched Clean Reserve and their sustainability practices, the more I started to love the company. They not only use reusable materials, clean energy, eco-friendly oils, but they even pay their workers fairly. Literally, what more could you love about a company?

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Citron Fig by Clean Reserve

Fragrance Notes: Ginger, lemon oil, cardamom, mandarin, mint, copaiba, sandalwood, cedarwood, and musk.

What it Smells Like: Having a really good dream and then waking up to the soft glow of the sun on your cheek. It also has the possibility of taking you back in time to the moment where you were first able to ride a bike without training wheels. Hey, I warned you.

The Perfume’s InspirationInspired by a free-spirited confidence that awakens when you realize your true potential.

Perfect forThe up and comer (aka totally me because I’m still trying to figure out the big, bad adult world).

How long does it last: 6-8 hours

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Sustainable IngredientsThey procure Cardamom from a local supplier in Guatemala who works directly with native Guatemalan farmers. This allows Clean to guarantee that the local farmers receive a higher profit for the essential oils and a steady income. Working directly with the communities in the Amazon and providing them with technical and financial support ensures the sustainable sourcing of Copaiba Oil and an increase of income for the farmers.

There are so many reasons why I think this is such an incredible company but the main one is that they are actually paying their farmers a living wage. My mom grew up on a dairy farm and from this, I know how hard farmers have to work in order to get the job done. Most of the time farmers are undercut by big corporations even though the farmers are doing all of the hard work. You often see this in any type of farm work from cotton farming to milk production to even essential oils. Companies like Clean Reserve are putting a stop to this unfair practice. I couldn’t be happier to wear their playful scent because of this.

For more information about their sustainable practices including their packaging I decided to pull this super informative picture from their website:

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Now that I know more about their company I literally want to try them all… is that bad? If I had to try another one next it would definitely be the Sueded Oud because we all know how I feel about patchouli (if you don’t definitely check out my weirdly obsessive blog post on this candle. But Sueded Oud is apparently for “the boss” so I might have to wait a while until I get to that level!

Have you ever heard or smelled perfumes from Clean Reserve? Let me know in the comments down below.

As always,

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5 Ways to Stop Buying Fast Fashion Today

Vent. Okay, so originally this post was going to be about my weekend and how wonderful it was visiting Terrain with Juliette from Julietteful (which by the way was all kinds of wonderful). But before I sat down to write this blog post I watched The True Cost on Netflix and I couldn’t focus because I was so unbelievably frustrated and overwhelmed. For those who don’t know, The True Cost is a documentary that explains negative impact fast fashion has on the social, economic, political, and environmental structures of developing countries. That was a mouthful. In short: fast fashion is ruining everything around us. But what really resonated with me were the following statistics:

  1. The fashion industry is the world’s second-largestpolluter. (Oil is the first).
  2. The world now consumes a staggering 80 billionpieces of clothing. (And we throw clothes away just as quickly as we consume them).
  3. One-in-six people work in the global fashion industry. (The majority of them are women and are being paid less than $3 a day).
  4. Only 10% of the clothes people donate to charity or thrift stores get sold (When the clothes are not sold, they are shipped to various developing countries where they are bought by the box and kill the local textile industry).

After watching this film, I feel so overwhelmed. I have been so blind to what was happening right underneath my nose. More than half the products I own I don’t even know where they came from. I don’t even know how my clothes came to American or the processes in which they were cut, dyed, or sewn. I love shopping and the “rush” of finding a good deal but I’m quickly realizing how wrong that is. Do I really want a cheaply made garment that will unravel after a few washes? Do I really want a garment that people have made with their own blood, sweat, and tears? I think it’s time I drastically rethink the way I consume, which is why I plan on implementing these steps into my daily life.

Recycled Fashion - Thrift ShoppingIMG_9387Sell your clothes on eBay. 

I know it feels great giving your clothes to charity and thrift stores but the harsh reality is that only 10% of those clothes are actually being sold and the majority of those profits aren’t going back to charity. Some second-hand stores even have a 30-day cycle so that if they aren’t sold in the 30 days they are removed and either thrown away or shipped in a box to a developing country. Once the box arrives at the developing country, buyers pick random boxes without knowing what exactly is inside. Those clothes then flood the textile industry in that country and diminish work opportunities.

By selling clothes on eBay you not only make a profit, but you can potentially donate that money to a charity that you choose. You then can know how much of your proceeds are actually going to the charity. Or you can simply just keep the money and use it to purchase clothes that are sustainable. I’ve been selling clothes on eBay for about a year now and have made a decent amount of money. It is a great way to have a little extra cash and I often use that money to buy sustainable alternatives. Let’s face it, I own a good amount of fast fashion clothes but I’m not going to just throw them all away because that would just be adding to the problem. Instead, I can think of different ways to reuse these items and get the longest life out of them.

Shop on eBay or go thrift shopping. 

Now, I know this idea might deter a few people but hear me out. This adorable dress was actually found thrifting. Since the cut of the dress is way too rebellious for my taste, I just threw on a simple turtleneck and called it a day. When I go thrift shopping, I really need to be in the right mood or else I won’t find anything. You really need to be open-minded to different ways you can style something. If you are, you’ll find endless things.

This is a great way to find vintage clothes and clothes for DIY projects. Plus, you’re helping cut down the impact of clothes that would be going to landfills and adding to our pollution problem.

IMG_9496Research the products and companies you’re buying from. 

This is something I’m still trying to get used to. As an American and a blogger, I love consuming countless things I really don’t need. This is why I’m trying to refocus what I’ve been putting my money towards and seeing if it is really worth it. For example, instead of spending $50-70 bucks on a pair of cheap boots that I knew my awkward, pigeon-toed feet would ruin, I decided to buy a pair of high-quality boots from Thursday Boot Co. I did just as much research on these boots as I would on a camera. I looked up what type of leather they use, where they manufacture the boots, and what other consumers say about the boots. Since we live in such a technology-driven world, there is really no excuse to not researching a company before you buy from them. Plus, this really helps cut down on my impulse shopaholic habits.

Quality over quantity. 

Just like my boots, you really want to make sure the products you’re buying are worth it. Are your boots going to last walking around three airports at top speed? Will that white shirt still look white after the 20th wash? Will that seam stay pull or unravel after the third wear? These are all questions I am starting to ask myself as I shop. I admit, I still shop and Marshalls and Nordstrom Rack. The only difference is that when I buy products from there I really want to make sure they’re really good quality. I no longer buy a $5 cotton shirt that is thinner than a piece of paper because I know that I might only get a few uses out of it. Plus, if the shirt is $5 think of how much the person making that shirt is getting paid. I’m hoping that as I start this journey I can start developing a sense of what is good quality and what isn’t. IMG_9401Lastly, just be aware.

Since fast fashion is so ingrained in our lives, it is so hard to quit cold turkey. I totally get that and I’m right there with you. But now that I’ve opened Pandora’s box for you, you’re going to start hearing a little nagging voice in the back of your head every time you want to buy a cheaply made shirt. Sorry! But, hopefully, your bank account will thank you.

If you want to know more about fast and slow fashion I highly recommend watching The True Cost on Netflix, listening or reading the book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Fast Fashion by Elizabeth L. Cline,  listening to the podcast Conscious Chatter by Kestrel Jenkins, and downloading the app Good on You. The following blogs are also great resources for finding more information on companies: Ecocult, Sustainably Chic, The Good Trade, and Ethical Unicorn.

IMG_9382Recycled Fashion - Thrift Shopping

Now I know conscious shopping isn’t for everyone, but I hope this makes you just a little bit more aware of where you’re getting your clothes. What do you think about fast fashion/slow fashion? Have you seen The True Cost? Let me know in the comments down below.

As always,

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